RoofMate: Fiberglass Blanket Insulation

 

 

TOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION

 

The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) reclassified fiberglass in October 2001 as "Not Classifiable as to carcinogenicity to humans"(Group 3).  In the IARC Monographs on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans, Fiberglass was classified under Group 3, meaning, "The agent is not classifiable as to its carcinogenicity to humans. This category is used most commonly for agents for which the evidence of carcinogenicity is inadequate in humans...". US National Toxicology Program (NTP), in June 2011, "also removed from its report on Carcinogens all biosoluble glass wool used in home and building insulation and for non-insulation products".

 

In 2001, IARC re-affirmed this designation. Because of the large diameter of continuous filament fibers, these fibers are not considered respirable. 

 

Fiberglass insulation is the most widely used insulation material in the US, Australia, and New ZealandThese developed countries are highly concerned with the welfare and safety of its people, as such, would not permit a material that poses health hazards to its general public. 

 

References:

  • National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Toxicology Program, Fact Sheet, "The Report on Carcinogens," June 2011. Seehttp://www.niehs.nih.gov/health/materials/the_report_on_carcinogens_12th... 

  • International Agency for Research on Cancer, IARC Monographs on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans: Man-Made Vitreous Fibres, Vol. 81 (Lyon, France: WHO/IARC, 2002).

  • Toxicological Profile for Synthetic Vitreous Fibers (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Services, Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry), September 2004.

  • International Agency for Research on Cancer, IARC Monographs on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Human: Man-made Mineral Fibres and Radon, Vol. 43 (Lyon, France: WHO/IARC, 1988), pp. 148-49, 152.